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Severe Weather

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Red Cross: Thunderstorm Safety

A thunderstorm is considered severe if it produces hail at least 1 inch in diameter or has wind gusts of at least 58 miles per hour. Every thunderstorm produces lightning, which kills more people each year than tornadoes or hurricanes. Heavy rain from thunderstorms can cause flash flooding, and high winds can damage homes and blow down trees and utility poles, causing widespread power outages.

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CDC: Lightning Safety

You can protect yourself and your family if you know what to do when you see lightning or when you hear thunder as a warning. Lightning strikes the earth more than 8 million times per day.

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Ready.gov: Thunderstorms and Lightning

All thunderstorms are dangerous. Every thunderstorm produces lightning. This ready.gov page provides education and information on staying safe during storms.

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Ready.gov: Severe Weather

Severe weather can happen anytime, in any part of the country. Severe weather can include hazardous conditions produced by thunderstorms, including damaging winds, tornadoes, large hail, flooding and flash flooding, and winter storms associated with freezing rain, sleet, snow and strong winds.

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